Are You Wasting Money In The Kitchen?

The age of austerity may have drawn to a close (at least on paper) but it doesn’t mean that households up and down the country aren’t extremely conscious of their expenditure. Indeed, as we see in the new year, many families across the nation look to the new year with a sense of hope and anticipation.

But also a great deal of apprehension. As the spectre of Brexit looms over us those on both the leave and remain side of the still raging debate fear that whatever happens, economic uncertainty lies ahead. In this context, no household can afford to waste money.

Indeed, as we see in the new year, many families across the nation look to the new year with a sense of hope and anticipation… But also a great deal of apprehension. As the spectre of Brexit looms over us those on both the leave and remain side of the still raging debate fear that whatever happens, economic uncertainty lies ahead. In this context, no household can afford to waste money.

Yet, wasting money is something that we as a nation are incredibly adept at doing. We like to convince ourselves that we are a thrifty and waste conscious nation but we can also be extremely wasteful in a number of ways.

From wasteful energy and water use to throwing away clothes we’ve worn once we are virtually addicted to waste. There are few places in the home where we are more wasteful than we are in the kitchen. The kitchen is the heart of the home.

It’s where meals and memories are made and the place where the whole family bonds over good food and conversation. With this in mind, if we cut down on money wastage in the kitchen, hopefully the principles we apply in this most hallowed of rooms can be applied to the rest of the home. Let’s take a look at some of the ways in which we can cut down costs in the kitchen…

Go plant based

You may, dear reader, have grown accustomed to seeing mentions of Veganuary flooding your social media timeline at the start of every year for the last few years.

Indeed, the global initiative that eschews meat, eggs and dairy products for a plant based diet and lifestyle has alerted many to the benefits of going vegan.

ot only is it a (potentially) healthier diet with much less saturated fat and the absence of processed meats (which are, let’s not forget, type 1 carcinogens) it can be a much thriftier way to eat too as well as being one of the most impactful things you can do for the planet.

Veggies, fruits, grains and pulses are cheaper than meat, eggs, dairy and offal and tend to last a lot longer helping you to cut down food bills and reduce food waste.

Keep your head in the fridge

Not literally, of course. But it’s worth sticking your head in the fridge every once in a while to take stock of what’s in there and plan the week’s meals accordingly. One of the biggest contributors to global food waste is poor refrigerator management.

For example, when you buy new foods, it may be quick and easy to position them at the front of the fridge. However, when we do this, we’re far more likely to forget about the stuff that’s lingering at the back. Before we know it we have a smelly fridge that’s half full of spoiled food.

Beware of false economy when buying cookware

It doesn’t matter whether you’re a reluctant cook or a culinary goddess, every kitchen needs plates, pots, pans and assorted cookware. However, as tempting as it may be to buy cheaper, it’s important to invest in high-quality cookware.

It might cost you a little more upfront but it will last you for years and years as well as making cooking (and washing up) easier and less stressful. Speaking of washing up…

Think twice about how you wash your dishes

Water is a precious commodity. There are still nations in the world where people struggle to get access to clean, drinkable water. If those people saw how we treat our readily available water supply they’d probably blanche with shock.

If you’re the kind of person who lets the water flow free while they do the washing you may be surprised to learn just how quickly all that water that goes down the drain adds up. Even a simple thing like buying a wash bowl can save you £25 a year.

Think twice before buying appliances that you really don’t need!

Finally, in many ways the kitchen is just like any other room in the house. It’s fun to put gadgets in your kitchen just as it is to fill your living room with them. They provide a talking point and can lend your kitchen an air of cutting-edge prestige… But how often do we actually use them?

It’s fun to look through catalogues and websites cooing over shiny chrome bread makers and those glorious (but criminally expensive) Kitchen Aid mixers. However, unless you’re a professional chef most of these high tech appliances are just a waste of money!

modern farmhouse style kitchen
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Micaela

A digital marketer by day and lifestyle blogger by night. Follow me @lifeinlilacblog

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3 Comments

  1. January 22, 2019 / 11:05 am

    This was a great read, thank you!

  2. January 22, 2019 / 12:27 pm

    I tend to buy the good bargains – but it is often better to spend money for quality on important things, such as cookware.

  3. January 22, 2019 / 1:45 pm

    This was an awesome post. I’m not a big fan of cooking and going out to eat has spoiled me. One of my big resolutions this year was to cook a few meals a week. Thank you for these helpful tips!

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